2024 Three Arctic Islands (Northbound)

SCORESBY SUND Revered by many as the most beautiful fjord system in the world, Scoresby Sund is definitely the longest and largest. The sound was named by William Scoresby Jr., a whaler, scientist and clergyman, who was famed for mapping more than 400 miles (640 km) of Greenland’s coastline. All previously mentioned East Greenland sites fall within Scoresby Sund. Svalbard 14TH OF JULY GLACIER Named after France’s Bastille Day (the 14th of July), this large glacier is situated in Krossfjorden, a bay on the northwest coast of Spitsbergen. The area is teeming with wildlife, and is the best place in Svalbard to catch a glimpse of the Atlantic puffin. Nesting at certain times of year along the shore are purple sandpipers, common eiders, barnacle

honors the expedition, the prince and the principality over which he reigned. While touring the glacier front by Zodiac cruise, listen to the crackle and pop of the brash ice, search for seals and have a chance to admire a natural sculpture gallery.

LILLIEHÖÖK GLACIER In 2005, nearly 100 years after his great- great-grandfather conducted scientific investigations here, Prince Albert II of Monaco returned to Lilliehöök Glacier to honor his ancestor’s memory. Here, you can take a Zodiac cruise amid labyrinths of sparkling icebergs, and witness breathtaking panoramas of ice. You may even spot bearded seals hauled out on the floes. LONGYEARBYEN Home to 2,400 people, the administrative capital of Svalbard is situated on the southern side of Adventfjorden. The settlement was founded in 1905 by John Munroe Longyear, the majority owner of the Arctic Coal Company of Boston. Today as much as ever, this is a true frontier town. MONACO GLACIER Prince Albert I of Monaco, a pioneer of oceanography, led an expedition to Svalbard in 1906. His team used sophisticated photographic techniques to understand the shape and position of several glacier fronts. Monaco Glacier

EXPEDITION SPIRIT Embracing the unexpected is part of the legacy—and excitement—of expedition travel. When traveling in extremely remote regions, your Expedition Team must consider the sea, ice, wildlife, and weather to guide the route and itinerary details. This itinerary is a tentative outline of what you’ll experience on this voyage; please be aware that no specific itinerary can be guaranteed. By the same token, wildlife encounters as described are expected, but not guaranteed. Your Expedition Team will use their considerable experience to seek out wildlife in known habitats, but the presence of any particular species of bird or marine wildlife is not guaranteed.

geese, Arctic tern and Brünnich’s guillemots (thick-billed murres). Bearded and ringed seals also frequent the waters here.

Call your Travel Professional or a Quark Polar Travel Adviser at 1.888.892.0073 | Visit QuarkExpeditions.com for additional details

16

Powered by